Monday, June 25, 2012

Double Book Review: Books With Weird Titles Edition: Wool and Draculas

Here are two books I've read recently, with not much in common other than having weird titles and being released directly to digital.

Wool, by Hugh Howey

Wool is the first in a long series of books about wool about people living in a mostly-underground silo after some sort of apocalypse makes the outside world inhabitable. Their only view of the outside world is through cameras that get dusty over time, until someone is sent out to clean them (with wool), then inevitably succumb to the poisonous atmosphere.

It's a small book with big ideas. It's small in its novella length, but also in its limited scope. It follows one character through an intimate story, never straying too far into the larger consequences of it. Yet the small story explores bigger themes of, among other things, truth and beauty.

There's nothing too new here, but it's nicely written, and balances emotional depth with hard sci-fi ideas. The second one was also good, but felt more like a tour of the setting to set up future instalments than a story where anything actually happens. Each instalment is only a few bucks and they are released frequently; it's definitely worth checking out the first one to decide if it's worth jumping into the rest of the series.

Draculas, by Jeff Strand, F. Paul Wilson, Jack Kilborn, Blake Crouch, and J. A. Konrath

Yeah, four authors. Yeah, Draculas with an S.

When an elderly, dying millionaire buys a skull with sharp, stabby teeth, then proceeds to stab himself in the neck with it, it starts an outbreak of vampires with similar bitey stabby tendencies. That's the premise of Draculas, in which vampires are slobbering, near-mindless animals with rows of needle-sharp teeth that need blood like we need air. It's a refreshing take on the played-out vampire trend.

The violence in Draculas is over the top, managing to be both hilarious and disturbing. It's clear that all four authors had a hell of a lot of fun writing it, which makes it a hell of a lot of fun to read.

There's not much in the way of plot; this is a summer action movie in novel form. But having no idea who will live or die keeps it interesting enough, especially with the strong characters. I particularly liked Randall, the borderline-challenged lumberjack whose substitution of "vampires" with "draculas" spreads through the characters faster than the vampire epidemic itself. And I won't spoil anything, but Benny the Clown's story takes some of the greatest twists and turns.

Despite the police-lineup-sized list of authors, Draculas is one cohesive novel-length story. On top of that, the Kindle Edition of Draculas comes with a bunch of DVD-like extras in it, including short stories by the authors and deleted scenes. Of particular interest to me as a writer, they included the unedited string of emails between authors that got the project going and worked out the logistics of writing it. It's fascinating — maybe even more fascinating than the book itself — to get that raw look at the creative process.

Anyway, if you're into monsters with sharp teeth and their intersection with human flesh, give Draculas a try.

P.S. It was almost impossible to write that review without mentioning sparkly vampires.







2 comments:

jeffstrand said...

Thanks for the review! The pain of not mentioning sparkly vampires until the P.S. must have been almost unbearable, but I salute you for succeeding!

Phronk said...

Oh hi Jeff Strand! Thank YOU for the kickass book.

It was so painful. I had to fill a 100 page text file with THESE AIN'T SPARKLY VAMPIRES repeated over and over just to recover.